IELTS Speaking
Speaking
Understanding the IELTS Speaking Test

Are you worried about the IELTS Speaking test? Don’t know what to expect? You’re not alone! Many of my students have been in the same position. Understanding what’s expected of you in the test is the first step to getting the results you need. Let's start with some facts: The Speaking test is the same for both IELTS General Training and IELTS Academic. It takes 11–14 minutes and is designed to assess a wide range of skills. The Speaking test is made up of three parts. There is one candidate and one examiner in the test room. The test is recorded (audio only, not video). Part 1 of the IELTS Speaking test In Part 1 of the Speaking test the examiner will introduce him/herself and ask you to confirm your identity. They will then ask you some general questions on familiar topics, such as work, study, where you live, friends and hobbies. You’re not expected to talk for a long time on each topic but you should explain your answers by giving reasons for what you say. Part 2 of the IELTS Speaking test In Part 2 of the Speaking test you have to talk for 1 to 2 minutes. You’ll be given a topic and some prompts on a piece of paper. You’ll get 1 minute to prepare what you’re going to say and then 2 minutes to talk. You’ll be given a pencil and some paper to make notes on. Here’s an example of a Part 2 task from page 78 of Top Tips for IELTS Academic for you to try. (Click on image to enlarge). Part 3 of the IELTS Speaking test In the final part of the Speaking test the examiner will ask some questions related to the topic from Part 2. These questions give you an opportunity to discuss more abstract issues and ideas. You’ll need to use language for giving and justifying opinions in this part of the test. The examiner The IELTS examiner will be fully qualified and registered. All examiners have to undergo the same training and certification, so no matter where you take your IELTS test, it will be exactly the same. (Click on image to enlarge). Is there something else you want to know about the IELTS Speaking test? Tell us on Facebook or Instagram. Good luck and get practising! Emma

Emma Cosgrave

4 March, 2020

Understanding the IELTS Speaking Test

IELTS Speaking

Are you worried about the IELTS Speaking test? Don’t know what to expect? You’re not alone! Many of my students have been in the same position. Understanding what’s expected of you in the test is the first step to getting the results you need.

Let's start with some facts:

  • The Speaking test is the same for both IELTS General Training and IELTS Academic.
  • It takes 11–14 minutes and is designed to assess a wide range of skills.
  • The Speaking test is made up of three parts.
  • There is one candidate and one examiner in the test room.
  • The test is recorded (audio only, not video).

Part 1 of the IELTS Speaking test

In Part 1 of the Speaking test the examiner will introduce him/herself and ask you to confirm your identity. They will then ask you some general questions on familiar topics, such as work, study, where you live, friends and hobbies. You’re not expected to talk for a long time on each topic but you should explain your answers by giving reasons for what you say.

Part 2 of the IELTS Speaking test

In Part 2 of the Speaking test you have to talk for 1 to 2 minutes. You’ll be given a topic and some prompts on a piece of paper. You’ll get 1 minute to prepare what you’re going to say and then 2 minutes to talk. You’ll be given a pencil and some paper to make notes on.

Here’s an example of a Part 2 task from page 78 of Top Tips for IELTS Academic for you to try.

Speaking Part 2 from Page 78 of Top Tips for IELTS Academic 

(Click on image to enlarge).

Part 3 of the IELTS Speaking test

In the final part of the Speaking test the examiner will ask some questions related to the topic from Part 2. These questions give you an opportunity to discuss more abstract issues and ideas. You’ll need to use language for giving and justifying opinions in this part of the test.

The examiner

The IELTS examiner will be fully qualified and registered. All examiners have to undergo the same training and certification, so no matter where you take your IELTS test, it will be exactly the same.

The Examiner

(Click on image to enlarge).

Is there something else you want to know about the IELTS Speaking test? Tell us on Facebook or Instagram.

Good luck and get practising!

Emma

Emma Cosgrave

Emma has been teaching IELTS for 20 years. She enjoys helping people to develop both their language skills and confidence.

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