How to become more fluent for IELTS Speaking?
Speaking
How to become more fluent for IELTS Speaking?

Welcome to the first in a series of 4 blog posts which will help you develop essential subskills for the IELTS Speaking test. Subskills can be defined as the smaller skills that make up a bigger skill, such as speaking. In this post, I will focus on the subskill of fluency.    What is fluency? According to the Cambridge English Dictionary, ‘when a person is fluent, they can speak a language easily, well and quickly’. We would, therefore, imagine a fluent speaker of a language to be somebody who is able to speak at length on a variety of different topics, without needing to stop and think very much about how to say something. Unfortunately, there is no quick way to become fluent in a language – it will always involve a lot of time, effort and motivation! Why is fluency important for the IELTS Speaking test? The IELTS Speaking assessment criteria covers four main areas of speaking. The first of these is Fluency and Coherence. According to the descriptor, ‘fluency and coherence assesses how well you can speak at a normal speed without too much hesitation. It also includes putting your sentences and ideas in a logical order and using cohesive devices appropriately so that what you say is not difficult to follow’.  Of course, how fluent you need to be depends on your target band score. If you need a 6.0, the descriptors state that you are ‘willing to speak at length, though may lose coherence at times due to occasional repetition, self-correction or hesitancy’. However, if you need a 7.0, you will need to ‘speak at length without noticeable effort or loss of coherence’. If you are aiming for a 6.5, you will need to demonstrate some details from band descriptor 6.0 and some from band descriptor 7.0.  What challenges might a student face in developing fluency? As I mentioned previously, achieving fluency requires time, effort and motivation. This is worth considering before you start to prepare for the IELTS exam. If you have the time to develop a good level of spoken English first, then you are likely to feel more confident about taking IELTS and achieve a higher score. However, many students have a limited amount of time to improve their general English before taking IELTS, which can make fluency a particular challenge.  One barrier to developing fluency in English is the lack of opportunity to practise speaking outside the classroom. It can be difficult to have the discipline to practise with somebody who speaks the same language as you and it may be hard to find somebody who does not, particularly if you’re preparing for IELTS in your home country. However, doing additional speaking practice is essential to improving your fluency. A further barrier is anxiety around speaking another language. You may know the language well, but when faced with a real-life communicative task, you become nervous and struggle to say what you had planned. This happened to me when I was travelling by train to Montreal and I wanted to buy a snack from the refreshments trolley. I’d studied for a year at a French university, but I couldn’t remember the simple language I needed. My husband managed to order for us, and the woman said to me – ‘don’t worry – he can teach you French’. My husband still loves telling that story!    3 top tips for boosting fluency  1. Find your perfect speaking partner This could be a classmate, housemate or neighbour. You could also try an online language exchange via Skype. Once you’ve found your perfect speaking partner, think about typical IELTS topics and practise speaking about these. You could use IELTS preparation resources, but authentic resources such as newspaper articles can be just as effective.  2. Make sure you keep talking When you practise speaking for fluency, you should aim to keep speaking for as long as you can. It’s therefore important that the person you are practising with knows not to interrupt you to correct mistakes. Instead, ask them to give you some general feedback at the end of the conversation.  3. Use strategies to buy time  If you need some time to think of what you’re going to say, there are a number of useful phrases that you can use to give yourself some thinking time. For example, you can use phrases like ‘let’s see …that’s a difficult question’ or ‘I’ve never really thought about that, but …’. Practise using these when you are doing speaking practice and they will start to come to you more naturally in conversations. Have a look at the new podcast series ‘All you Need for IELTS Success’ on preparing for the IELTS Speaking test for further advice on how to buy time and keep talking.  Next time, I’ll share the essential vocabulary you need to help you in the IELTS Speaking test. Lucy

We Love IELTS

18 September, 2020

How to become more fluent for IELTS Speaking?

How to become more fluent for IELTS Speaking?

Welcome to the first in a series of 4 blog posts which will help you develop essential subskills for the IELTS Speaking test. Subskills can be defined as the smaller skills that make up a bigger skill, such as speaking. In this post, I will focus on the subskill of fluency. 

 

What is fluency?

According to the Cambridge English Dictionary, ‘when a person is fluent, they can speak a language easily, well and quickly’. We would, therefore, imagine a fluent speaker of a language to be somebody who is able to speak at length on a variety of different topics, without needing to stop and think very much about how to say something. Unfortunately, there is no quick way to become fluent in a language – it will always involve a lot of time, effort and motivation!

Why is fluency important for the IELTS Speaking test?

The IELTS Speaking assessment criteria covers four main areas of speaking. The first of these is Fluency and Coherence. According to the descriptor, ‘fluency and coherence assesses how well you can speak at a normal speed without too much hesitation. It also includes putting your sentences and ideas in a logical order and using cohesive devices appropriately so that what you say is not difficult to follow’. 

Of course, how fluent you need to be depends on your target band score. If you need a 6.0, the descriptors state that you are ‘willing to speak at length, though may lose coherence at times due to occasional repetition, self-correction or hesitancy’. However, if you need a 7.0, you will need to ‘speak at length without noticeable effort or loss of coherence’. If you are aiming for a 6.5, you will need to demonstrate some details from band descriptor 6.0 and some from band descriptor 7.0. 

What challenges might a student face in developing fluency?

As I mentioned previously, achieving fluency requires time, effort and motivation. This is worth considering before you start to prepare for the IELTS exam. If you have the time to develop a good level of spoken English first, then you are likely to feel more confident about taking IELTS and achieve a higher score. However, many students have a limited amount of time to improve their general English before taking IELTS, which can make fluency a particular challenge. 

One barrier to developing fluency in English is the lack of opportunity to practise speaking outside the classroom. It can be difficult to have the discipline to practise with somebody who speaks the same language as you and it may be hard to find somebody who does not, particularly if you’re preparing for IELTS in your home country. However, doing additional speaking practice is essential to improving your fluency.

A further barrier is anxiety around speaking another language. You may know the language well, but when faced with a real-life communicative task, you become nervous and struggle to say what you had planned. This happened to me when I was travelling by train to Montreal and I wanted to buy a snack from the refreshments trolley. I’d studied for a year at a French university, but I couldn’t remember the simple language I needed. My husband managed to order for us, and the woman said to me – ‘don’t worry – he can teach you French’. My husband still loves telling that story! 
 

3 top tips for boosting fluency 

1. Find your perfect speaking partner

This could be a classmate, housemate or neighbour. You could also try an online language exchange via Skype. Once you’ve found your perfect speaking partner, think about typical IELTS topics and practise speaking about these. You could use IELTS preparation resources, but authentic resources such as newspaper articles can be just as effective. 

2. Make sure you keep talking

When you practise speaking for fluency, you should aim to keep speaking for as long as you can. It’s therefore important that the person you are practising with knows not to interrupt you to correct mistakes. Instead, ask them to give you some general feedback at the end of the conversation. 

3. Use strategies to buy time 

If you need some time to think of what you’re going to say, there are a number of useful phrases that you can use to give yourself some thinking time. For example, you can use phrases like ‘let’s see …that’s a difficult question’ or ‘I’ve never really thought about that, but …’. Practise using these when you are doing speaking practice and they will start to come to you more naturally in conversations. Have a look at the new podcast series ‘All you Need for IELTS Success’ on preparing for the IELTS Speaking test for further advice on how to buy time and keep talking. 

Next time, I’ll share the essential vocabulary you need to help you in the IELTS Speaking test.

Lucy

We Love IELTS

We Love IELTS gives IELTS test takers all the preparation materials and advice they need for success.

More about the author

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Official Cambridge Guide to IELTS

This all-in-one study guide provides comprehensive preparation for IELTS Academic and General Training and is packed with activities, practice tests and tips to help you maximise your IELTS score. It covers the language and skills you need to perform with confidence. Organised by skill, you can study from start to finish or focus on areas that you need most help with. *Book Depository is an online bookstore which offers free worldwide delivery. Alternatively, you can find it at your local bookstore or online shop.

Using artificial intelligence to check and improve your spoken accuracy
Speaking
Using artificial intelligence to check and improve your spoken accuracy

Almost everyone has access to at least one item with this, they use it a lot of the time and it makes their lives much easier. I’m thinking about Artificial Intelligence, or AI, particularly something which has speech recognition software or a speech generation function. These products that only respond once their name is said – Alexa, Siri, Hello Google, etc. – aren't just good for requesting music, they can be a useful tool in spoken English development. Can AI help you with your IELTS speaking skills? I think so.    Judgment free feedback I’m going to focus on Alexa just because that’s the one I use most. However, much of what I suggest is true for other similar tools. This form of AI can help language learners particularly with pronunciation development by being a non-judgmental checker of the sounds in English you use. If what you say is not understood, then it will say so or it will answer according to what it thought it heard. There’s no shame in either of those and it can be sometimes the fault of the machine. Consider this as a learning opportunity. Remember to change the language to English on your device before following the suggestions below.  Pronounce words better: We know there are a number of difficult words to pronounce. For IELTS Speaking, your pronunciation will be assessed along with other key parts of your speech. You don't get marks for having a British or American accent, but for being intelligible (able to understand what you're saying). Create a list of words you’d like to use especially when in the Speaking test.  So, you’ve seen them written down and you’re now familiar with the meaning and when to use the word – this is important here. Start by asking your AI for a definition of the word. Did it understand what you said? Was that the meaning you thought it was? If so, great. If not, don’t worry – try again and listen to the word in an online dictionary. Perhaps your word stress was slightly wrong, or a vowel sound wasn’t quite right. No need to be upset – no one is judging you. That’s the beauty of this system.  Go further and ask how many syllables your chosen word has – again, this will check you’ve pronounced it well enough. Try to find words with more than 3 or 4 syllables. Again, allow any misunderstandings to be an opportunity for learning. Of course, with many of these devices, you need to ask questions – something you don’t often do in the IELTS Speaking test. Carefully think about how you will put these words (or phrases) into simple questions that will check your pronunciation and probably your grammar – rephrase or repeat your question until you feel you’ve been understood. Conversation practice: You can take this approach further by using phrases and sentences. How long can you maintain the conversation? This is a new thing from Alexa called ‘Let’s chat’ – it’s actually a competition that developers are taking part in to see if they can create a ‘socialbot’. Keep an eye out for this as it’s in the early stages but apparently you can talk about a topic with an AI device for up to 20 minutes on many everyday topics.  Remember, breakdowns in communication and misunderstandings are opportunities for you to improve, and you can always blame the technology! Interestingly, you can hear and read your questions and conversations again by accessing the app – this will give you a transcript to check and delete later if you’re concerned about privacy.    Part 2 speaking development  Moving on from individual words and phrases and short questions and answers, let’s now consider IELTS Speaking Part 2. You’ll receive a card and you’ll have to speak about a topic for up to two minutes. There are many examples of possible topic cards online – select a few for the activity I’m about to explain. Without a teacher or even a fellow student, it may seem impossible to get feedback but you can record your answer and then listen again and identify places where you know you’ve made a mistake. Perhaps you didn’t talk about one of the key points or you spoke for too long. Perhaps you made a number of grammar mistakes you can now see. AI can help you go further here.  (Click to enlarge) Remember though that with AI, it’s a computer so it’s not perfect. But it does give you non-judgmental feedback for you to use to improve your speaking and better prepare for the exam. Jishan

Jishan Uddin

19 August, 2020

Using artificial intelligence to check and improve your spoken accuracy

Using artificial intelligence to check and improve your spoken accuracy

Almost everyone has access to at least one item with this, they use it a lot of the time and it makes their lives much easier. I’m thinking about Artificial Intelligence, or AI, particularly something which has speech recognition software or a speech generation function. These products that only respond once their name is said – Alexa, Siri, Hello Google, etc. – aren't just good for requesting music, they can be a useful tool in spoken English development. Can AI help you with your IELTS speaking skills? I think so. 

 

Judgment free feedback

I’m going to focus on Alexa just because that’s the one I use most. However, much of what I suggest is true for other similar tools. This form of AI can help language learners particularly with pronunciation development by being a non-judgmental checker of the sounds in English you use. If what you say is not understood, then it will say so or it will answer according to what it thought it heard. There’s no shame in either of those and it can be sometimes the fault of the machine. Consider this as a learning opportunity. Remember to change the language to English on your device before following the suggestions below. 

Pronounce words better: We know there are a number of difficult words to pronounce. For IELTS Speaking, your pronunciation will be assessed along with other key parts of your speech. You don't get marks for having a British or American accent, but for being intelligible (able to understand what you're saying). Create a list of words you’d like to use especially when in the Speaking test. 

So, you’ve seen them written down and you’re now familiar with the meaning and when to use the word – this is important here. Start by asking your AI for a definition of the word. Did it understand what you said? Was that the meaning you thought it was? If so, great. If not, don’t worry – try again and listen to the word in an online dictionary. Perhaps your word stress was slightly wrong, or a vowel sound wasn’t quite right. No need to be upset – no one is judging you. That’s the beauty of this system. 

Go further and ask how many syllables your chosen word has – again, this will check you’ve pronounced it well enough. Try to find words with more than 3 or 4 syllables. Again, allow any misunderstandings to be an opportunity for learning. Of course, with many of these devices, you need to ask questions – something you don’t often do in the IELTS Speaking test. Carefully think about how you will put these words (or phrases) into simple questions that will check your pronunciation and probably your grammar – rephrase or repeat your question until you feel you’ve been understood.

Conversation practice: You can take this approach further by using phrases and sentences. How long can you maintain the conversation? This is a new thing from Alexa called ‘Let’s chat’ – it’s actually a competition that developers are taking part in to see if they can create a ‘socialbot’. Keep an eye out for this as it’s in the early stages but apparently you can talk about a topic with an AI device for up to 20 minutes on many everyday topics. 

Remember, breakdowns in communication and misunderstandings are opportunities for you to improve, and you can always blame the technology! Interestingly, you can hear and read your questions and conversations again by accessing the app – this will give you a transcript to check and delete later if you’re concerned about privacy. 

 

Part 2 speaking development 

Moving on from individual words and phrases and short questions and answers, let’s now consider IELTS Speaking Part 2. You’ll receive a card and you’ll have to speak about a topic for up to two minutes. There are many examples of possible topic cards online – select a few for the activity I’m about to explain. Without a teacher or even a fellow student, it may seem impossible to get feedback but you can record your answer and then listen again and identify places where you know you’ve made a mistake. Perhaps you didn’t talk about one of the key points or you spoke for too long. Perhaps you made a number of grammar mistakes you can now see. AI can help you go further here. 

Follow these steps

(Click to enlarge)

Remember though that with AI, it’s a computer so it’s not perfect. But it does give you non-judgmental feedback for you to use to improve your speaking and better prepare for the exam.

Jishan

Jishan Uddin

Jishan has been an English teacher mostly at UK universities for over fifteen years and has extensive experience in teaching, co-ordinating and leading on a range of modules and courses. He is also an author for Cambridge University Press for whom he has written students' and teachers' books for IELTS exam preparation courses.

More about the author

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Official Cambridge Guide to IELTS

This all-in-one study guide provides comprehensive preparation for IELTS Academic and General Training and is packed with activities, practice tests and tips to help you maximise your IELTS score. It covers the language and skills you need to perform with confidence. Organised by skill, you can study from start to finish or focus on areas that you need most help with. *Book Depository is an online bookstore which offers free worldwide delivery. Alternatively, you can find it at your local bookstore or online shop.

Top 5 ways to improve your IELTS Speaking skills every day
Speaking
Top 5 ways to improve your IELTS Speaking skills every day

Being able to speak English fluently is the goal of most language learners. Speaking English when you're travelling or living abroad can make the experience easier. But if you don’t live in an English-speaking country, then having the opportunity to practice speaking in English is quite difficult.  Here are the top 5 ways to improve your speaking skills every single day.  1. Read! That’s right, you read that correctly! Much like writing (see 5 Ways to Improve your IELTS Writing Skills Every Day blog), reading widely will introduce you to a wide range of words and phrases. You’ll also be reading a wide range of grammar structures without actually having to focus on grammar. By being exposed (presented with) words and grammar used correctly and in context, you too will pick up new words and start using new grammatical structures. When you learn new words or structures, copy and paste them into a document or make a note of them on your phone, to help you remember them.  There are loads of freely available reading resources online. The most important thing is that you read about any topic you’re interested in, but it must be in English for this to help you with your speaking skill.   2. Listen!  Listen to music, the news, podcasts, the radio, anything and everything you can. Do this every day – while you’re having breakfast, sitting on the bus or at the gym. In the evenings, watch English speaking movies, TV and Netflix programmes with English subtitles on. You can find more tips for Listening here. The more English you listen to, the more vocabulary and grammar you’ll learn (without having to do any real work) and the better your pronunciation will be.  3. Talk to yourself in English!  A good way to practise speaking English is to talk to yourself when you’re alone. It can be quite embarrassing to try and speak English with others especially if you feel that your vocabulary isn’t very good but speaking to yourself isn’t embarrassing, is it?  Start by watching your favourite English-speaking programme with English subtitles. Watch for five minutes – listen and read the subtitles. Rewind and start again. The follow these instructions:   Watch the first few minutes again and listen to your recording. How did you sound? Can you do it better the next time? Focus on the pronunciation of the words, the rhythm of the sentence, the way the speakers link sounds between words, etc. You can repeat the same sequence as many times as you like.   4. Think in English!  It will also really help if you can think in English. It might sound a little strange but it really does help. Give yourself instructions in English for example; ‘I’m thirsty. Go to the kitchen, get a glass, turn on the tap…’. You could also keep a thoughts and feelings diary in English. Write down what you’re thinking and how you’re feeling.  Try changing the default language on your mobile phones so that all the apps and information is in English. Do the same on any of your devices.  Play online games in English. Join online English chat forums. Respond to our Facebook and Instagram posts and stories in English. You may not be speaking but you will be thinking and responding in English! 5. Use technology! If you don’t want to talk to yourself why not talk to Siri, Alexa or Google Assistant? Don’t type a question into Google or whichever search engine you use; ask your personal assistant instead.  Going somewhere new? Ask your personal assistant to find the location and tell you the directions instead.  There are also apps which help connect you with native English speakers around the world. Here are a some of them:  HelloTalk Tandem Bilingua  HiNative In this new world that we live in we have to find new ways of speaking to people, technology has made that easier to do than ever before.  Start speaking English today! Every day! We hope this blog has been useful. Let us know which tip or tips you’re going to start using on our Facebook page. Liz

Liz Marqueiro

5 August, 2020

Top 5 ways to improve your IELTS Speaking skills every day

Top 5 ways to improve your IELTS Speaking skills every day

Being able to speak English fluently is the goal of most language learners. Speaking English when you're travelling or living abroad can make the experience easier. But if you don’t live in an English-speaking country, then having the opportunity to practice speaking in English is quite difficult. 

Here are the top 5 ways to improve your speaking skills every single day. 

1. Read!

That’s right, you read that correctly! Much like writing (see 5 Ways to Improve your IELTS Writing Skills Every Day blog), reading widely will introduce you to a wide range of words and phrases. You’ll also be reading a wide range of grammar structures without actually having to focus on grammar. By being exposed (presented with) words and grammar used correctly and in context, you too will pick up new words and start using new grammatical structures. When you learn new words or structures, copy and paste them into a document or make a note of them on your phone, to help you remember them. 

There are loads of freely available reading resources online. The most important thing is that you read about any topic you’re interested in, but it must be in English for this to help you with your speaking skill.  

2. Listen! 

Listen to music, the news, podcasts, the radio, anything and everything you can. Do this every day – while you’re having breakfast, sitting on the bus or at the gym. In the evenings, watch English speaking movies, TV and Netflix programmes with English subtitles on. You can find more tips for Listening here.

The more English you listen to, the more vocabulary and grammar you’ll learn (without having to do any real work) and the better your pronunciation will be. 

3. Talk to yourself in English! 

A good way to practise speaking English is to talk to yourself when you’re alone. It can be quite embarrassing to try and speak English with others especially if you feel that your vocabulary isn’t very good but speaking to yourself isn’t embarrassing, is it? 

Start by watching your favourite English-speaking programme with English subtitles. Watch for five minutes – listen and read the subtitles. Rewind and start again. The follow these instructions:

Talk to yourself in English Instructions

 

Watch the first few minutes again and listen to your recording. How did you sound? Can you do it better the next time? Focus on the pronunciation of the words, the rhythm of the sentence, the way the speakers link sounds between words, etc. You can repeat the same sequence as many times as you like.
 

4. Think in English! 

It will also really help if you can think in English. It might sound a little strange but it really does help. Give yourself instructions in English for example; ‘I’m thirsty. Go to the kitchen, get a glass, turn on the tap…’.

You could also keep a thoughts and feelings diary in English. Write down what you’re thinking and how you’re feeling. 

Try changing the default language on your mobile phones so that all the apps and information is in English. Do the same on any of your devices. 

Play online games in English. Join online English chat forums. Respond to our Facebook and Instagram posts and stories in English. You may not be speaking but you will be thinking and responding in English!

5Use technology!

If you don’t want to talk to yourself why not talk to Siri, Alexa or Google Assistant? Don’t type a question into Google or whichever search engine you use; ask your personal assistant instead. 

Going somewhere new? Ask your personal assistant to find the location and tell you the directions instead. 

There are also apps which help connect you with native English speakers around the world. Here are a some of them: 

In this new world that we live in we have to find new ways of speaking to people, technology has made that easier to do than ever before. 

Start speaking English today! Every day!

We hope this blog has been useful. Let us know which tip or tips you’re going to start using on our Facebook page.

Liz

Liz Marqueiro

Liz has been teaching IELTS around the world for over 25 years.

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Preparing for Part 2 of the IELTS Speaking Test
Speaking
Preparing for Part 2 of the IELTS Speaking Test

Do you find part 2 of the IELTS Speaking test difficult? You're not alone. Many people get really nervous about this. Don't panic, We Love IELTS is here to help.     Listening Practice: Listen to Emma read preparing for Part 2 of the IELTS Speaking Test     Following on from my post about part 1 of the IELTS Speaking test today, I am going to  look at Part 2, explaining what it is and how to prepare for it so that you are confident and relaxed when you take the test. Part 2 of the IELTS Speaking test is designed to test your ability to talk for a longer time. It gives you an opportunity to speak fluently about a personal experience.  Let’s start by looking at the format. The Speaking test is the same for both the Academic and General Training IELTS tests.  Part 2 lasts for a total of 4 to 5 minutes. The examiner will give you a cue card, a pencil, some paper and explain that you have 1 minute to prepare a 2-minute talk on the topic on the card. The cue card will look like this: (Click to enlarge) As you can see the cue card gives you the topic in the first line and then 4 areas to talk about. It’s helpful to use this as the structure of your talk. During the 1-minute preparation time you can make notes - these help you to plan your ideas and also help you if you get stuck in the middle of your talk.  Here are some things to remember: keep notes short - just a few words for each point on the cue card write notes in English (you don’t want to be translating as you talk) organise your notes so that they follow the prompts on the cue card try different approaches: lists, mind maps, words scattered on the paper.   Two minutes can feel like a very long time so make sure you choose something (from the above example) you can talk about for 2 minutes, this could mean adding to the story with extra information. Don’t worry about telling the truth, you’re being tested on your ability to organise your ideas and talk fluently on a topic! Don’t try to make the whole thing up though, that can be really hard, you may just want to add a few details that are not 100% accurate to show off some more vocabulary.  When you talk for longer than you would in a normal two-way conversation, it is important to think about cohesion, the way you link your ideas together. Be careful, though - using linkers that are too formal will make your speaking sound unnatural. Here are some linking devices to use in your speaking:   because    so     also      in addition on top of that        but  on the other hand   So, now you have a cue card, an idea of how to organise your notes and some linkers that you can use in your Speaking test. The only thing left to do is have a go.  Using this cue card, try making notes in different way and think about what works best for you. Here are two formats you could use:  (Click to enlarge) (Click to enlarge) Before your test, make sure you‘ve done lots of practice questions. Practise speaking with an alarm set to go off after two minutes so you can get a sense of how much you need to say. Be warned, if you have nothing to say it can feel like forever!  Another really great way to prepare is to record yourself (use your phone to do this.). Listen back and ask the following questions:  (Click to enlarge) Using sample cue cards, prepare for a minute and then talk for 2 minutes, record yourself and listen back, ask those questions and analyse your own work. The more you do it, the easier it will become and the more confident you will be.  Good luck everyone! Emma 

Emma Cosgrave

9 July, 2020

Preparing for Part 2 of the IELTS Speaking Test

Preparing for Part 2 of the IELTS Speaking Test

Do you find part 2 of the IELTS Speaking test difficult? You're not alone. Many people get really nervous about this. Don't panic, We Love IELTS is here to help. 

 

Listening Icon Listening Practice: Listen to Emma read preparing for Part 2 of the IELTS Speaking Test

 

 

Following on from my post about part 1 of the IELTS Speaking test today, I am going to  look at Part 2, explaining what it is and how to prepare for it so that you are confident and relaxed when you take the test.

Part 2 of the IELTS Speaking test is designed to test your ability to talk for a longer time. It gives you an opportunity to speak fluently about a personal experience. 

Let’s start by looking at the format. The Speaking test is the same for both the Academic and General Training IELTS tests. 

Part 2 lasts for a total of 4 to 5 minutes. The examiner will give you a cue card, a pencil, some paper and explain that you have 1 minute to prepare a 2-minute talk on the topic on the card. The cue card will look like this:

Extract from PAGE 143 of The Official Cambridge Guide to IELTS

(Click to enlarge)

As you can see the cue card gives you the topic in the first line and then 4 areas to talk about. It’s helpful to use this as the structure of your talk. During the 1-minute preparation time you can make notes - these help you to plan your ideas and also help you if you get stuck in the middle of your talk. 

Here are some things to remember:

  • keep notes short - just a few words for each point on the cue card
  • write notes in English (you don’t want to be translating as you talk)
  • organise your notes so that they follow the prompts on the cue card
  • try different approaches: lists, mind maps, words scattered on the paper.  

Two minutes can feel like a very long time so make sure you choose something (from the above example) you can talk about for 2 minutes, this could mean adding to the story with extra information. Don’t worry about telling the truth, you’re being tested on your ability to organise your ideas and talk fluently on a topic! Don’t try to make the whole thing up though, that can be really hard, you may just want to add a few details that are not 100% accurate to show off some more vocabulary. 

When you talk for longer than you would in a normal two-way conversation, it is important to think about cohesion, the way you link your ideas together. Be careful, though - using linkers that are too formal will make your speaking sound unnatural. Here are some linking devices to use in your speaking:

 

because    so     also      in addition

on top of that        but 

on the other hand

 

So, now you have a cue card, an idea of how to organise your notes and some linkers that you can use in your Speaking test. The only thing left to do is have a go

Using this cue card, try making notes in different way and think about what works best for you. Here are two formats you could use: 

Making notes - mind map

(Click to enlarge)

Making notes - lists format

(Click to enlarge)

Before your test, make sure you‘ve done lots of practice questions. Practise speaking with an alarm set to go off after two minutes so you can get a sense of how much you need to say. Be warned, if you have nothing to say it can feel like forever! 

Another really great way to prepare is to record yourself (use your phone to do this.). Listen back and ask the following questions: 

Speaking Questions

(Click to enlarge)

Using sample cue cards, prepare for a minute and then talk for 2 minutes, record yourself and listen back, ask those questions and analyse your own work. The more you do it, the easier it will become and the more confident you will be. 

Good luck everyone!

Emma 

Official Cambridge Guide to IELTS - Recommended by Emma

Emma Cosgrave

Emma has been teaching IELTS for 20 years. She enjoys helping people to develop both their language skills and confidence.

More about the author

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Recommended For You

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Official Cambridge Guide to IELTS

This all-in-one study guide provides comprehensive preparation for IELTS Academic and General Training and is packed with activities, practice tests and tips to help you maximise your IELTS score. It covers the language and skills you need to perform with confidence. Organised by skill, you can study from start to finish or focus on areas that you need most help with. *Book Depository is an online bookstore which offers free worldwide delivery. Alternatively, you can find it at your local bookstore or online shop.

Top tips from examiners for IELTS Speaking
Speaking
Top tips from examiners for IELTS Speaking

As an author for IELTS, I always find it's really important to fully understand the exam and hear from experiences of a really important group of people: IELTS examiners. Many of them have been doing this for a long time and have seen thousands of students. I asked some of them for their top tips to give to students taking the Speaking test and this is what they said:  Familiarise yourself with each part of the exam: As you can imagine, many examiners said that it’s essential that candidates are familiar with all the procedural aspects of the exam before taking it. That means that you should know how the exam works, how many parts there are and what is expected for each part. Of course, all good learners will do that! Make sure you answer the questions:  Sounds obvious but examiners have told me that too often candidates answer questions with answers that aren’t relevant. What often happens is that learners think they’ve heard a certain question – or maybe they’ve planned for a certain topic and want the question to be about this and so mishear the examiner – when in fact the examiner has asked something different.  One good piece of advice here is to ask the examiner to repeat the question if you’re not sure – better this than you give an answer that’s not related to the question. What if you hear the question correctly but the examiner uses an unfamiliar word? You can ask the examiner to explain that word to you. Again, it’s better to do that than guess the meaning incorrectly and start giving an answer concerning something you weren’t asked about. Once you’re confident about what you’ve been asked, it’s time to answer. Make sure you provide enough detail in your answers to get as high a score as possible. Expand on your initial answer by giving explanations and examples. Take your time and make yourself time: Not even native speakers can give the perfect answer immediately. Trust me, I’ve had many job interviews where I’ve tried to answer straight away and wish I had just given myself a little bit more time to think. Of course, you don’t want to appear as if you are hesitating or lack fluency so here’s a good tip. Paraphrase – or put in other words but with the same meaning – the examiner’s question back to them and then add a small comment like ‘that’s an interesting question’ or ‘that’s something I haven’t really thought about’. This will ‘buy’ yourself extra thinking time and it’s perfectly natural to do as long as you don’t do exactly the same thing for every single question. I certainly wish I had done this for my last interview!  As well as giving yourself time, think about how best to use it. You shouldn’t be in too much of a hurry to answer the questions. Take your time and think about what you want to say. Speaking too quickly without taking the time to organise your thoughts can negatively affect your message’s coherence and may make it sound a bit muddled. Perform at your best in Part 2: To give yourself the best chance of doing well in Part 2, you should use all of the 1 minute preparation time before the long turn in this part. Ensure you have read the topic and prompts carefully so that you are confident that you know what you’ll say. Also, make notes in response to the prompts. These should just be keywords but having them will help you give a good answer. One examiner told me that some candidates forgot to answer the question in part 2. It seems amazing that this can happen, but apparently this is particularly frequent with candidates with lower levels of English. If that sounds too obvious for you to make the same mistake, then that’s great. Hopefully by reading this you’ll definitely not make this mistake in the exam.  One last bit of advice about Part 2’s long turn is that you should keep speaking until the examiner asks you to stop. When the examiner does this by indicating that you’ve run out of time, finish your last sentence and stop. That way you can finish in a more natural way. Hopefully these top tips can help you do even better in your next IELTS exam.  Good luck! Jishan

Jishan Uddin

3 July, 2020

Top tips from examiners for IELTS Speaking

Top tips from examiners for IELTS Speaking

As an author for IELTS, I always find it's really important to fully understand the exam and hear from experiences of a really important group of people: IELTS examiners. Many of them have been doing this for a long time and have seen thousands of students. I asked some of them for their top tips to give to students taking the Speaking test and this is what they said: 

Familiarise yourself with each part of the exam:

As you can imagine, many examiners said that it’s essential that candidates are familiar with all the procedural aspects of the exam before taking it. That means that you should know how the exam works, how many parts there are and what is expected for each part. Of course, all good learners will do that!

Make sure you answer the questions: 

Sounds obvious but examiners have told me that too often candidates answer questions with answers that aren’t relevant. What often happens is that learners think they’ve heard a certain question – or maybe they’ve planned for a certain topic and want the question to be about this and so mishear the examiner – when in fact the examiner has asked something different. 

One good piece of advice here is to ask the examiner to repeat the question if you’re not sure – better this than you give an answer that’s not related to the question. What if you hear the question correctly but the examiner uses an unfamiliar word? You can ask the examiner to explain that word to you. Again, it’s better to do that than guess the meaning incorrectly and start giving an answer concerning something you weren’t asked about. Once you’re confident about what you’ve been asked, it’s time to answer. Make sure you provide enough detail in your answers to get as high a score as possible. Expand on your initial answer by giving explanations and examples.

Take your time and make yourself time:

Not even native speakers can give the perfect answer immediately. Trust me, I’ve had many job interviews where I’ve tried to answer straight away and wish I had just given myself a little bit more time to think. Of course, you don’t want to appear as if you are hesitating or lack fluency so here’s a good tip. Paraphrase – or put in other words but with the same meaning – the examiner’s question back to them and then add a small comment like ‘that’s an interesting question’ or ‘that’s something I haven’t really thought about’. This will ‘buy’ yourself extra thinking time and it’s perfectly natural to do as long as you don’t do exactly the same thing for every single question. I certainly wish I had done this for my last interview! 

As well as giving yourself time, think about how best to use it. You shouldn’t be in too much of a hurry to answer the questions. Take your time and think about what you want to say. Speaking too quickly without taking the time to organise your thoughts can negatively affect your message’s coherence and may make it sound a bit muddled.

Perform at your best in Part 2:

To give yourself the best chance of doing well in Part 2, you should use all of the 1 minute preparation time before the long turn in this part. Ensure you have read the topic and prompts carefully so that you are confident that you know what you’ll say. Also, make notes in response to the prompts. These should just be keywords but having them will help you give a good answer. One examiner told me that some candidates forgot to answer the question in part 2. It seems amazing that this can happen, but apparently this is particularly frequent with candidates with lower levels of English. If that sounds too obvious for you to make the same mistake, then that’s great. Hopefully by reading this you’ll definitely not make this mistake in the exam. 

One last bit of advice about Part 2’s long turn is that you should keep speaking until the examiner asks you to stop. When the examiner does this by indicating that you’ve run out of time, finish your last sentence and stop. That way you can finish in a more natural way.

Hopefully these top tips can help you do even better in your next IELTS exam. 

Good luck!

Jishan

Jishan Uddin

Jishan has been an English teacher mostly at UK universities for over fifteen years and has extensive experience in teaching, co-ordinating and leading on a range of modules and courses. He is also an author for Cambridge University Press for whom he has written students' and teachers' books for IELTS exam preparation courses.

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Top Tips for IELTS Academic

This pocket-sized revision guide gives you essential advice for each part of the IELTS Academic test. It includes clear examples and explanations to show you exactly what each tip means, general tips for each paper, and sections on how to revise and what to do on test day. It also comes with an interactive IELTS practice test on CD-ROM. *Book Depository is an online bookstore which offers free worldwide delivery. Alternatively, you can find it at your local bookstore or online shop.

All you need for IELTS success podcast
Speaking
Prepare for IELTS Speaking with our NEW podcast

We're pleased to announce the launch of our podcast, 'All you need for IELTS success'. This podcast is for anyone taking the IELTS test. Every episode we'll be joined by experts from the world of IELTS (teachers, authors and former IELTS examiners) to help you prepare for your test. We know preparing for IELTS can be challenging, which is why we're here to help. So whether you're taking Academic or General Training, you have six weeks or six months to prepare, we hope we can help you on your IELTS journey. Please see highlights of our current episodes and links to listen below: Episode 1: Top 5 IELTS questions answered In this episode, IELTS teachers Emma and Liz answer five questions they are frequently asked by their IELTS students. They cover the following questions: How can I prepare for IELTS at home? Which IELTS test should I prepare for? How long will it take me to prepare for IELTS? What is the difference between the computer delivered IELTS test and the paper based one Is the IELTS test easier in my home country? {"preview_thumbnail":"/sites/default/files/styles/video_embed_wysiwyg_preview/public/video_thumbnails/r9O6K3G9AyA.jpg?itok=sJhT-tYZ","video_url":"https://youtu.be/r9O6K3G9AyA","settings":{"responsive":1,"width":"854","height":"480","autoplay":0},"settings_summary":["Embedded Video (Responsive)."]}   Episode 2: Prepare for IELTS Speaking Part 1 In this episode, IELTS teachers Emma and Liz discuss part 1 of the IELTS Speaking test. Introduction to the IELTS Speaking test What is Part 1? Student/Examiner Speaking Part 1 examples and critique Hints and Tips to aid your preparation {"preview_thumbnail":"/sites/default/files/styles/video_embed_wysiwyg_preview/public/video_thumbnails/esTeWQEJ8mM.jpg?itok=6N_HvpPo","video_url":"https://youtu.be/esTeWQEJ8mM","settings":{"responsive":1,"width":"854","height":"480","autoplay":0},"settings_summary":["Embedded Video (Responsive)."]}   Episode 3: Prepare for IELTS Speaking Part 2 In this episode, IELTS teachers Emma and Liz discuss part 2 of the IELTS Speaking test. Introduction to Part 2 of the Speaking test What will you see on a cue card How to plan and answer the question Student/Examiner Speaking Part 2 example and critique {"preview_thumbnail":"/sites/default/files/styles/video_embed_wysiwyg_preview/public/video_thumbnails/dqliM1CT8Oo.jpg?itok=fMT4w2bB","video_url":"https://youtu.be/dqliM1CT8Oo","settings":{"responsive":1,"width":"854","height":"480","autoplay":0},"settings_summary":["Embedded Video (Responsive)."]}   Episode 4: Prepare for IELTS Speaking Part 3 In this episode, IELTS teachers Emma and Liz discuss part 3 of the IELTS Speaking test. Introduction to Part 3 of the Speaking test How to form opinions What is an unpopular opinion Examples from IELTS 12 (part of our authentic practice tests series) {"preview_thumbnail":"/sites/default/files/styles/video_embed_wysiwyg_preview/public/video_thumbnails/DTbJd5vWN-s.jpg?itok=YF-ENwHY","video_url":"https://youtu.be/DTbJd5vWN-s","settings":{"responsive":1,"width":"854","height":"480","autoplay":0},"settings_summary":["Embedded Video (Responsive)."]}   LISTEN NOW:       If you like this podcast, do rate and review on your preferred podcast player – this will help us to create new episodes and share more hints and tips to help you on your IELTS journey. Don't forget to subscribe to make sure you never miss another episode.

We Love IELTS

6 May, 2020

Prepare for IELTS Speaking with our NEW podcast

All you need for IELTS success podcast

We're pleased to announce the launch of our podcast, 'All you need for IELTS success'.
This podcast is for anyone taking the IELTS test. Every episode we'll be joined by experts from the world of IELTS (teachers, authors and former IELTS examiners) to help you prepare for your test.

We know preparing for IELTS can be challenging, which is why we're here to help. So whether you're taking Academic or General Training, you have six weeks or six months to prepare, we hope we can help you on your IELTS journey.

Please see highlights of our current episodes and links to listen below:

Episode 1: Top 5 IELTS questions answered

In this episode, IELTS teachers Emma and Liz answer five questions they are frequently asked by their IELTS students. They cover the following questions:

  1. How can I prepare for IELTS at home?
  2. Which IELTS test should I prepare for?
  3. How long will it take me to prepare for IELTS?
  4. What is the difference between the computer delivered IELTS test and the paper based one
  5. Is the IELTS test easier in my home country?

 

Episode 2: Prepare for IELTS Speaking Part 1

In this episode, IELTS teachers Emma and Liz discuss part 1 of the IELTS Speaking test.

  • Introduction to the IELTS Speaking test
  • What is Part 1?
  • Student/Examiner Speaking Part 1 examples and critique
  • Hints and Tips to aid your preparation

 

Episode 3: Prepare for IELTS Speaking Part 2

In this episode, IELTS teachers Emma and Liz discuss part 2 of the IELTS Speaking test.

  • Introduction to Part 2 of the Speaking test
  • What will you see on a cue card
  • How to plan and answer the question
  • Student/Examiner Speaking Part 2 example and critique

 

Episode 4: Prepare for IELTS Speaking Part 3

In this episode, IELTS teachers Emma and Liz discuss part 3 of the IELTS Speaking test.

 

LISTEN NOW:

Listen on apple podcasts   Listen on Google Podcasts  Listen on Spotify

If you like this podcast, do rate and review on your preferred podcast player – this will help us to create new episodes and share more hints and tips to help you on your IELTS journey. Don't forget to subscribe to make sure you never miss another episode.

We Love IELTS

We Love IELTS gives IELTS test takers all the preparation materials and advice they need for success.

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IELTS Speaking Word Game
Speaking
IELTS Speaking Game: Don't Say It!

When you're speaking in English, do you sometimes find that halfway through a sentence you can't remember the word you want? Or do you find yourself talking about something and realise that you don't actually know the word you need in English? Don't worry – it's not just you – it’s a very common problem. This is a game you can play with a friend or in teams. It’s called Don’t Say It! – the title tells you the main instruction in the game!  Here’s a quick guide on how to play it. There’ll be examples after so that you can see how it works: 1. There is a pile of cards with a phrase and three to four words written underneath on each card. The cards are laid face down so no one can see what is on top. 2. One person picks up a card and doesn’t show it to anyone else. The card has an underlined word or phrase on the top and then a list of three or four other words.  3. The person who picked the card then needs to describe the underlined phrase. But, and here’s where it gets more difficult, they must NOT say ANY of the words on the card. They have 1 minute to try to get their partner or team to guess what they’re talking about. If they repeat any of the words on the card their turn is over.  4. If their partner or team can guess the word or phrase, they get a point. If not, it is offered to the other team to guess. If that team guesses the correct answer, they win the point. The next person picks up a new card and the game continues as above.  This game is fun (and a little frustrating!) but it’s also great practice for the Speaking test.  In the IELTS speaking test, showing you can keep up a conversation if you don't know a word is as important, or maybe even more important, as knowing the right word. If you forget the one word you need, you can then use the same techniques you use in this game. Using expressions like these can help you keep talking when you get stuck.  This is something which... You use this to... It's the same as... It's the opposite of... It's a place where... This is something you do when... This is a person who... Here are some cards for you to have some fun with, why not download and print to create your card deck. You could even make your own. Even native speakers find this game difficult but everyone thinks it’s fun! Go on, try it.  Liz

Liz Marqueiro

17 April, 2020

IELTS Speaking Game: Don't Say It!

IELTS Speaking Word Game

When you're speaking in English, do you sometimes find that halfway through a sentence you can't remember the word you want? Or do you find yourself talking about something and realise that you don't actually know the word you need in English? Don't worry – it's not just you – it’s a very common problem.

This is a game you can play with a friend or in teams. It’s called Don’t Say It! – the title tells you the main instruction in the game! 

Here’s a quick guide on how to play it. There’ll be examples after so that you can see how it works:

1. There is a pile of cards with a phrase and three to four words written underneath on each card. The cards are laid face down so no one can see what is on top.

2. One person picks up a card and doesn’t show it to anyone else. The card has an underlined word or phrase on the top and then a list of three or four other words. 

3. The person who picked the card then needs to describe the underlined phrase. But, and here’s where it gets more difficult, they must NOT say ANY of the words on the card. They have 1 minute to try to get their partner or team to guess what they’re talking about. If they repeat any of the words on the card their turn is over. 

4. If their partner or team can guess the word or phrase, they get a point. If not, it is offered to the other team to guess. If that team guesses the correct answer, they win the point. The next person picks up a new card and the game continues as above. 

This game is fun (and a little frustrating!) but it’s also great practice for the Speaking test. 

In the IELTS speaking test, showing you can keep up a conversation if you don't know a word is as important, or maybe even more important, as knowing the right word. If you forget the one word you need, you can then use the same techniques you use in this game. Using expressions like these can help you keep talking when you get stuck. 

  • This is something which...
  • You use this to...
  • It's the same as...
  • It's the opposite of...
  • It's a place where...
  • This is something you do when...
  • This is a person who...

Here are some cards for you to have some fun with, why not download and print to create your card deck. You could even make your own.

IELTS Speaking Word Game

Even native speakers find this game difficult but everyone thinks it’s fun!

Go on, try it. 

Liz

Voicabulary For IELTS Advanced used by Liz

Liz Marqueiro

Liz has been teaching IELTS around the world for over 25 years.

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Cambridge Vocabulary for IELTS Advanced

Learn all the vocabulary you need to achieve band 6.5 and above in IELTS Academic and IELTS General Training. It includes useful tips on how to learn vocabulary and covers tricky areas such as the language needed to describe data and processes. This book also includes practice exercises for each skill, regular progress checks and tips on how to avoid typical errors. *Book Depository is an online bookstore which offers free worldwide delivery. Alternatively, you can find it at your local bookstore or online shop.

PART 1 IELTS SPEAKING TEST
Speaking
Preparing for the IELTS Speaking Test: Part 1

The IELTS Speaking test is designed to see how well you can communicate in English. There are 3 parts to the test, each part lasts for about 5 minutes and is important!  Today we are talking about part 1 - what it is and how to prepare for it. What to expect: The questions in Part 1 of the test are all about your life. When you enter the test room and sit down, smile and say, ‘hello’.  The examiner will ask you to say your name, check what country you come from and ask to see your identification. The examiner will then ask some questions about things like your hometown, job, studies, family and friends, hobbies, holidays, customs and tourism in your country and so on.  The challenge in Part 1 is to give answers that really show off your English rather than simple answers.  You could give a very short, simple answer e.g. Examiner: Are you working or studying at the moment? You: I’m working There is nothing grammatically wrong with this answer but there is nothing impressive about it either. Let’s try again. Examiner: Are you working or studying at the moment? You: I’m working as an architect. After graduating from university 2 years ago, I spent 6 months looking for the right job, finally I found it. I love my job because I get to travel all over the country and work on some really amazing projects.  Preparing for the test: DON’T memorise whole answers, instead brainstorm vocabulary for topic areas that might come up in part 1. Think about the questions someone might ask you about the topic if they were getting to know you. To extend your answers ask yourself ‘why’ after each question and add your reasons to your answer.  Here are some example questions with answers that I would give: Topic: HOME Examiner: Do you live in a flat or a house? My answer: live in a house. It is a semi-detached house that has 3 bedrooms, just enough for my family. I live there with my husband and children. I have lived in flats before and during that time I always wished I had a garden, now that I live in a house, I am lucky, I have a small garden. Examiner: What would you like to change about your home? My answer:I would love to convert my garage into an office so that when I work from home, I wouldn’t always sit at my kitchen table. I would love to have a bit more space as well, another bedroom and bathroom, so that friends could come and stay over, that would be great! Examiner: Did you live in the same place as a child? My answer: I didn’t live in this house when I was a child, but I did live nearby. I walk past my childhood home often and it always brings back really happy memories of playing with my sister on our bikes in the street outside. I am glad that my kids are getting to grow up in this neighbourhood too. (Click to enlarge) Download the topic list to help you practise for Part 1 of the test and why not share it with your friends so you can work on the answers together? Good luck!  Emma

Emma Cosgrave

7 April, 2020

Preparing for the IELTS Speaking Test: Part 1

PART 1 IELTS SPEAKING TEST

The IELTS Speaking test is designed to see how well you can communicate in English. There are 3 parts to the test, each part lasts for about 5 minutes and is important! 

Today we are talking about part 1 - what it is and how to prepare for it.

What to expect:

The questions in Part 1 of the test are all about your life.

When you enter the test room and sit down, smile and say, ‘hello’. 

The examiner will ask you to say your name, check what country you come from and ask to see your identification. The examiner will then ask some questions about things like your hometown, job, studies, family and friends, hobbies, holidays, customs and tourism in your country and so on. 

The challenge in Part 1 is to give answers that really show off your English rather than simple answers. 

You could give a very short, simple answer e.g.

  • Examiner: Are you working or studying at the moment?
  • You: I’m working

There is nothing grammatically wrong with this answer but there is nothing impressive about it either. Let’s try again.

  • Examiner: Are you working or studying at the moment?
  • You: I’m working as an architect. After graduating from university 2 years ago, I spent 6 months looking for the right job, finally I found it. I love my job because I get to travel all over the country and work on some really amazing projects. 

Preparing for the test:

DON’T memorise whole answers, instead brainstorm vocabulary for topic areas that might come up in part 1. Think about the questions someone might ask you about the topic if they were getting to know you. To extend your answers ask yourself ‘why’ after each question and add your reasons to your answer. 

Here are some example questions with answers that I would give:

Topic: HOME

  • Examiner: Do you live in a flat or a house?
  • My answer: live in a house. It is a semi-detached house that has 3 bedrooms, just enough for my family. I live there with my husband and children. I have lived in flats before and during that time I always wished I had a garden, now that I live in a house, I am lucky, I have a small garden.
  • Examiner: What would you like to change about your home?
  • My answer:I would love to convert my garage into an office so that when I work from home, I wouldn’t always sit at my kitchen table. I would love to have a bit more space as well, another bedroom and bathroom, so that friends could come and stay over, that would be great!
  • Examiner: Did you live in the same place as a child?
  • My answer: I didn’t live in this house when I was a child, but I did live nearby. I walk past my childhood home often and it always brings back really happy memories of playing with my sister on our bikes in the street outside. I am glad that my kids are getting to grow up in this neighbourhood too.
IELTS Speaking Topic List

(Click to enlarge)

Download the topic list to help you practise for Part 1 of the test and why not share it with your friends so you can work on the answers together?

Good luck! 

Emma

Official Cambridge Guide to IELTS - Recommended by Emma

Emma Cosgrave

Emma has been teaching IELTS for 20 years. She enjoys helping people to develop both their language skills and confidence.

More about the author

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Official Cambridge Guide to IELTS

This all-in-one study guide provides comprehensive preparation for IELTS Academic and General Training and is packed with activities, practice tests and tips to help you maximise your IELTS score. It covers the language and skills you need to perform with confidence. Organised by skill, you can study from start to finish or focus on areas that you need most help with. *Book Depository is an online bookstore which offers free worldwide delivery. Alternatively, you can find it at your local bookstore or online shop.

IELTS Speaking
Speaking
Understanding the IELTS Speaking Test

Are you worried about the IELTS Speaking test? Don’t know what to expect? You’re not alone! Many of my students have been in the same position. Understanding what’s expected of you in the test is the first step to getting the results you need. Let's start with some facts: The Speaking test is the same for both IELTS General Training and IELTS Academic. It takes 11–14 minutes and is designed to assess a wide range of skills. The Speaking test is made up of three parts. There is one candidate and one examiner in the test room. The test is recorded (audio only, not video). Part 1 of the IELTS Speaking test In Part 1 of the Speaking test the examiner will introduce him/herself and ask you to confirm your identity. They will then ask you some general questions on familiar topics, such as work, study, where you live, friends and hobbies. You’re not expected to talk for a long time on each topic but you should explain your answers by giving reasons for what you say. Part 2 of the IELTS Speaking test In Part 2 of the Speaking test you have to talk for 1 to 2 minutes. You’ll be given a topic and some prompts on a piece of paper. You’ll get 1 minute to prepare what you’re going to say and then 2 minutes to talk. You’ll be given a pencil and some paper to make notes on. Here’s an example of a Part 2 task from page 78 of Top Tips for IELTS Academic for you to try. (Click on image to enlarge). Part 3 of the IELTS Speaking test In the final part of the Speaking test the examiner will ask some questions related to the topic from Part 2. These questions give you an opportunity to discuss more abstract issues and ideas. You’ll need to use language for giving and justifying opinions in this part of the test. The examiner The IELTS examiner will be fully qualified and registered. All examiners have to undergo the same training and certification, so no matter where you take your IELTS test, it will be exactly the same. (Click on image to enlarge). Is there something else you want to know about the IELTS Speaking test? Tell us on Facebook or Instagram. Good luck and get practising! Emma

Emma Cosgrave

4 March, 2020

Understanding the IELTS Speaking Test

IELTS Speaking

Are you worried about the IELTS Speaking test? Don’t know what to expect? You’re not alone! Many of my students have been in the same position. Understanding what’s expected of you in the test is the first step to getting the results you need.

Let's start with some facts:

  • The Speaking test is the same for both IELTS General Training and IELTS Academic.
  • It takes 11–14 minutes and is designed to assess a wide range of skills.
  • The Speaking test is made up of three parts.
  • There is one candidate and one examiner in the test room.
  • The test is recorded (audio only, not video).

Part 1 of the IELTS Speaking test

In Part 1 of the Speaking test the examiner will introduce him/herself and ask you to confirm your identity. They will then ask you some general questions on familiar topics, such as work, study, where you live, friends and hobbies. You’re not expected to talk for a long time on each topic but you should explain your answers by giving reasons for what you say.

Part 2 of the IELTS Speaking test

In Part 2 of the Speaking test you have to talk for 1 to 2 minutes. You’ll be given a topic and some prompts on a piece of paper. You’ll get 1 minute to prepare what you’re going to say and then 2 minutes to talk. You’ll be given a pencil and some paper to make notes on.

Here’s an example of a Part 2 task from page 78 of Top Tips for IELTS Academic for you to try.

Speaking Part 2 from Page 78 of Top Tips for IELTS Academic 

(Click on image to enlarge).

Part 3 of the IELTS Speaking test

In the final part of the Speaking test the examiner will ask some questions related to the topic from Part 2. These questions give you an opportunity to discuss more abstract issues and ideas. You’ll need to use language for giving and justifying opinions in this part of the test.

The examiner

The IELTS examiner will be fully qualified and registered. All examiners have to undergo the same training and certification, so no matter where you take your IELTS test, it will be exactly the same.

The Examiner

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Good luck and get practising!

Emma

Emma Cosgrave

Emma has been teaching IELTS for 20 years. She enjoys helping people to develop both their language skills and confidence.

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