Making progress in small doses
CommonMistakes
Making progress in small doses

'I didn't know. Now I know.' This is a comment on one of our Facebook posts. It was an answer to one of the riddles posted there and after I read it, I couldn't get the comment out of my head. To me, it represents the joy of learning and the transformative power of knowledge. So, I thought I’d try a little experiment. I looked at an area of my life where I’m trying to acquire new knowledge and I wrote down three things I didn’t know. I am currently teaching myself how to use a particular architecture software for fun – I have weird hobbies, I know.   Here’s my list of three things I didn’t know:  I don’t know how to create double-height ceilings.  I don’t know how to import a particular flooring material into the software.  I don’t know the difference between a CMU stem wall and a concrete stem wall.  I then spent the next two hours researching the answers to the questions and practised applying my new knowledge to a model I’m creating. At the end of the two hours, I was able to say: ‘I didn’t know. Now I know.’ That was deeply, deeply satisfying.  Since I got the idea from one of our followers, I thought it was only fair that I would consider how IELTS test takers might benefit from this method, which is not all that new, I’m sure, but it’s new to me so I guess some of you might not have considered this either.  So here’s an IELTS example: I don’t know the difference between ‘when’, ‘if’ and ‘whether’.  I don’t know how to use apostrophes.  I don’t know the difference between ‘number’ and ‘amount’.  A while ago, I talked about the importance of SMART goals, and I guess, whatever we put on theses lists would have to be specific, measurable, achievable, realistic and time-bound, otherwise we’d never get this ‘Now I know’ moment, but other than that, this list could contain anything you fell you need. If you don’t quite know where to start with this, you might want to look at Common Mistakes at IELTS Intermediate. The learning points in there are highly relevant to the exam and focused enough to give you lots of little success moments. You might even be able to extend the quote to say: ‘I didn’t know that I didn’t know. Now I know’.   Sophie

Sophie Hodgson

9 December, 2020

Making progress in small doses

Making progress in small doses

'I didn't know. Now I know.' This is a comment on one of our Facebook posts. It was an answer to one of the riddles posted there and after I read it, I couldn't get the comment out of my head. To me, it represents the joy of learning and the transformative power of knowledge. So, I thought I’d try a little experiment. I looked at an area of my life where I’m trying to acquire new knowledge and I wrote down three things I didn’t know. I am currently teaching myself how to use a particular architecture software for fun – I have weird hobbies, I know.  

Here’s my list of three things I didn’t know: 

  1. I don’t know how to create double-height ceilings. 
  2. I don’t know how to import a particular flooring material into the software. 
  3. I don’t know the difference between a CMU stem wall and a concrete stem wall. 

I then spent the next two hours researching the answers to the questions and practised applying my new knowledge to a model I’m creating. At the end of the two hours, I was able to say: ‘I didn’t know. Now I know.’ That was deeply, deeply satisfying. 

Since I got the idea from one of our followers, I thought it was only fair that I would consider how IELTS test takers might benefit from this method, which is not all that new, I’m sure, but it’s new to me so I guess some of you might not have considered this either. 

So here’s an IELTS example:

  • I don’t know the difference between ‘when’, ‘if’ and ‘whether’. 
  • I don’t know how to use apostrophes. 
  • I don’t know the difference between ‘number’ and ‘amount’. 

A while ago, I talked about the importance of SMART goals, and I guess, whatever we put on theses lists would have to be specific, measurable, achievable, realistic and time-bound, otherwise we’d never get this ‘Now I know’ moment, but other than that, this list could contain anything you fell you need.

If you don’t quite know where to start with this, you might want to look at Common Mistakes at IELTS Intermediate. The learning points in there are highly relevant to the exam and focused enough to give you lots of little success moments. You might even be able to extend the quote to say: ‘I didn’t know that I didn’t know. Now I know’.  

Sophie

Sophie Hodgson

Sophie has been supporting students on their IELTS journey since 2003 and feels privileged to have watched them succeed. While most people probably do not like taking tests, Sophie believes that preparing for the IELTS exam can be both interesting and fun. She loves language and structure and enjoys exploring both with her students to help them achieve their aims.

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Common Mistakes at IELTS Intermediate

This book highlights the real mistakes that students make in the IELTS test and shows how to avoid them. Each unit targets a key problem area and is based on analysis of thousands of real tests takers' exams. Clear explanations and exercises show you how to use the language accurately. You can check what you’ve learned in the units with regular tests. *Book Depository is an online bookstore which offers free worldwide delivery. Alternatively, you can find it at your local bookstore or online shop.

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