How to improve your vocabulary around personality
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How to improve your vocabulary around personality

There are many words in English to describe someone's personality – the type of person someone is because of how they behave, think and feel – and choosing the right ones can sometimes be tricky. But, if you get the opportunity in your IELTS Speaking test to talk about someone’s personality, it’s a chance to impress the examiner with how much vocabulary you know! So, complete the following three exercises and then see if you can use any of the vocabulary in the IELTS Speaking Part 2 topic at the end of this post.  Adjectives Look at the following adjectives (words used to describe nouns) and decide if any of them describe your personality:   If you’re not sure what some of these adjectives mean or how to pronounce them, you can use a dictionary to check and then come back and decide if they apply to you. Personalising vocabulary like this (i.e. connecting new words/phrases to your own experiences and opinions) is one way to improve your vocabulary for IELTS, and it can be more effective than trying to memorise a list of vocabulary that you don’t relate to your own life. More adjectives Look at the following adjectives and decide if they usually describe positive qualities or negative qualities:   To check whether you have put the words into the correct category, use a dictionary and download this completed table and compare it to your answers. Putting vocabulary into categories like this based on their meaning requires a deeper level of thought than trying to memorise vocabulary from lists and will help you remember the vocabulary for longer.  Prefixes You may have noticed in the exercises above, or perhaps you knew already, that you can add a prefix to some adjectives to turn a positive quality into a negative one. For example, the prefix ‘im’ (meaning ‘not’) can be added to the word ‘patient’ to create the word ‘impatient’ (meaning ‘not patient’). Which prefix (im, in or un) is the correct one to use with the following adjectives to create words with the opposite meanings? considerate polite reliable You can check your answers at the end of this post. Word-building strategies like this can help you improve your vocabulary more quickly as you learn different ways to use new words! IELTS Speaking Part 2 Now, for a chance to use some of the vocabulary and to help you remember it, try the following: Read the IELTS Speaking Part 2 task below from Vocabulary for IELTS Advanced Give yourself one minute to think about what you want to say and make some notes Talk about the topic for one to two minutes   For more vocabulary exercises and tips on learning vocabulary, check out my IELTS vocabulary posts on the topic of education, technology and energy. If you did all of the vocabulary exercises above and in my other posts, I’d use the adjective ‘diligent’ to describe your vocabulary learning.  Well done! Pete PS The answers to the prefixes question are: inconsiderate, impatient and unreliable.

Pete Jones

23 October, 2020

How to improve your vocabulary around personality

How to improve your vocabulary around personality

There are many words in English to describe someone's personality – the type of person someone is because of how they behave, think and feel – and choosing the right ones can sometimes be tricky.

But, if you get the opportunity in your IELTS Speaking test to talk about someone’s personality, it’s a chance to impress the examiner with how much vocabulary you know!

So, complete the following three exercises and then see if you can use any of the vocabulary in the IELTS Speaking Part 2 topic at the end of this post. 

Adjectives

Look at the following adjectives (words used to describe nouns) and decide if any of them describe your personality:

List of words for personality

 

If you’re not sure what some of these adjectives mean or how to pronounce them, you can use a dictionary to check and then come back and decide if they apply to you.

Personalising vocabulary like this (i.e. connecting new words/phrases to your own experiences and opinions) is one way to improve your vocabulary for IELTS, and it can be more effective than trying to memorise a list of vocabulary that you don’t relate to your own life.

More adjectives

Look at the following adjectives and decide if they usually describe positive qualities or negative qualities:

Personality words in a table

 

To check whether you have put the words into the correct category, use a dictionary and download this completed table and compare it to your answers.

Putting vocabulary into categories like this based on their meaning requires a deeper level of thought than trying to memorise vocabulary from lists and will help you remember the vocabulary for longer. 

Prefixes

You may have noticed in the exercises above, or perhaps you knew already, that you can add a prefix to some adjectives to turn a positive quality into a negative one.

For example, the prefix ‘im’ (meaning ‘not’) can be added to the word ‘patient’ to create the word ‘impatient’ (meaning ‘not patient’).

Which prefix (im, in or un) is the correct one to use with the following adjectives to create words with the opposite meanings?

  • considerate
  • polite
  • reliable

You can check your answers at the end of this post.

Word-building strategies like this can help you improve your vocabulary more quickly as you learn different ways to use new words!

IELTS Speaking Part 2

Now, for a chance to use some of the vocabulary and to help you remember it, try the following:

  1. Read the IELTS Speaking Part 2 task below from Vocabulary for IELTS Advanced
  2. Give yourself one minute to think about what you want to say and make some notes
  3. Talk about the topic for one to two minutes
Speaking Part 2 Task from Vocabulary for IELTS Advanced

 

For more vocabulary exercises and tips on learning vocabulary, check out my IELTS vocabulary posts on the topic of education, technology and energy.

If you did all of the vocabulary exercises above and in my other posts, I’d use the adjective ‘diligent’ to describe your vocabulary learning. 

Well done!

Pete

PS The answers to the prefixes question are: inconsiderate, impatient and unreliable.

Pete Jones

Pete has been helping IELTS test takers and teachers for many years and really enjoys helping people improve their English and their IELTS band score.

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